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Full Intro: Katharine Ruppert




Introducing... Katharine Ruppert

REAL NAME:
Katie Ruppert

STAGE NAME:
Katie Ruppert (I'm so original)

LAST SHOW YOU ADDED TO YOUR RESUME:
Directorally: Footloose. Performance wise: Rosencrantz and Guildernstern are Dead

LAST SHOW YOU AUDITIONED FOR:
Nickle and Dimed at Foothill College

DID YOU GET INTO IT:
Yes, I'll be playing Maddy (the feisty maid) and Barbara's Daughter

LAST SONG YOU USED AT AN AUDITION:
Bye Bye Birdie from Bye Bye Birdie. Wow. That was quite awhile ago.

FAVORITE THEATRE (VENUE) THAT YOU HAVE PERFORMED IN: I really like the Lohman theatre at Foothill college. I really enjoy 3-quarter seating.

FAVORITE MUSICAL:
Thats tough. I've always loved Once Upon A Mattress and Bye Bye Birdie. Since I directed Beauty and the Beast it's developed a very special place in my heart as well. And I love Wicked (and really anything about OZ) . But, I think my favorite would be Meet Me in St. Louis. Oh, and Animal Crackers. I saw it in Ashland last year. Best two hours of my existence.

FAVORITE PLAY
I eternally love Taming of the Shrew, August Osage County and The Three Musketeers by Ken Ludwig. And The Importance of Being Ernest. Oscar Wilde is brilliant.

NAME A THEATRE SUPERSTITION
"Macbeth"

LAST PART YOU PLAYED IN A SHOW:
Gertrude in Rosencrantz & Guildernstern are Dead.

YOUR GOAL IN SHOW BUSINESS:
I would love to be part of a work that I could help develop the plot and content as well as originate and create a really memorable, fun lasting role. I also would like to turn "The Pirates of the Caribbean" and "Viva Las Vegas" into live stage shows.

FAVORITE DIRECTOR:
I cannot choose just one. I feel like every director has taught me from their triumphs and mistakes and in turned me into the director I am today.

WHAT WAS YOUR VERY FIRST SHOW:
Story Time- I was the "mean bunny" from the tortoise and the hair. I was very upset about playing a bad guy, so my mom made me a pink bunny costume. Little did I know that I would go through a period later in my life where I would exclusively play villains by choice.

HAVE YOU EVER HAD A DANCE SOLO:
Nope, but I've choreographed plenty of them.

HAVE YOU EVER HAD A SINGING SOLO:
Si

HAVE YOU EVER BEEN THE LAST PERSON TO TAKE A BOW:
Very nearly several times. I've been "the lead" but for some reason it hasn't happened. I don't really care about bow order.

NAME A SHOW YOU’VE DONE MORE THAN ONCE:
Once Upon A Mattress

HAVE YOU BEEN TO LA:
Yes, it's horrible.

SCARIEST PART OF AN AUDITION:
Those eight seconds right before you walk in the room.

BEST PART OF AN AUDITION:
When and if the director laughs. And cold reads. Once I get to cold reads, I'm golden.

NAME A SHOW YOU WOULD NEVER DO AGAIN:
I don't think I've been in or directed a show I would NEVER do again. The works we did in Middle school were pretty obscure, but I highly doubt I would have the chance to do them again. Maybe Homeroom. It was obscure and the songs are still stuck in my head six years later.

NAME A SHOW YOU COULD DO FOR YEARS.

Thats a tie. The second time I was in "Mattress" I felt masterful. The cast was a complete jewel and I could have enjoyed a run of that for years.

On the other hand I think when I was doing Gilligan's Island I was learning the most. I mean, I was working with actors who were just leaps and bounds better than me and every show and rehearsal felt like a master class.

NAME A SHOW YOU WOULD LOVE TO DO BUT HAVE NEVER BEEN IN:
Taming of the Shrew, Importance of Being Ernest, Bye Bye Birdie, Singing in the Rain, Three Musketeers...

NAME A PERSON YOU’D LIKE TO WORK WITH AGAIN
A shorter list would encompass who I refuse to work with. 95% of the people I've had the privilege to act along side or direct have just been lovely. There are very few people who I would reject working with again.

WHAT ARE YOU AUDITIONING FOR NEXT:
Well, I just got a callback for a show that doesn't even start rehearsals for six months, so we'll see how that pans out. Other than that, it's up in the air. I might try out for the City Lights season and Much Ado. I don't know. At all.

HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN PERFORMING:
14 years.

DO YOU CARRY YOUR HEADSHOTS AROUND WITH YOU:
Not anymore. I like my headshot and resume to be double sided and my resume changes every 2-3 months, so I was wasting alot of paper keeping everything updated.

DO YOU KEEP IN TOUCH WITH PAST CAST MEMBERS:
I'm not very good at that. I try, but with 8-10 shows a year for the past two years, I'm lucky to keep in touch with my current cast members.

ON A SCALE OF 1-10 HOW IMPORTANT IS GETTING PAID:
I used to say it wasn't. Now that I'm in the thick of it, it's become increasingly important. If it wasn't for my parents and generous grandmother, I'd be living in a card board box. I'll say seven.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST MEMORABLE PERFORMANCE:
I've had a lot of great roles. But, the one that I can most clearly remember the reactions from was when I played Blue Beard at 14. Maybe it's because the 700 person audience went insane every time I stepped on stage. Maybe it's because I was playing a gay man. But it's probably because my peers never let me forget about it, and when I went to receive my high school diploma, many of my fellow classmates did the sassy pirate dance in my honor.

WHAT’S SOMETHING EMBARRASSING OR UNEXPECTED THAT HAPPENED TO YOU WHILE ON STAGE?
I dislocated my shoulder on stage. I hid it well, and the audience didn't know until after the show when the cast was figuring out who was taking me to the hospital. The stage manager (who is now my business partner) took me home and my Dad popped it back in, but I spent the rest of the 14 show run with a big swollen shoulder and a sling.

BEST PROFESSIONAL SHOW(S) YOU’VE SEEN:
Animal Crackers, Taming of the Shrew & the Unfortunates in Ashland, Wicked (the first time I saw it in SF) and August Osage County at City Lights Theatre.

ONSTAGE, HAVE YOU EVER… (in character)
a) Been killed? Yes, in And Then There Were None
b) Been drunk/stoned? Yes, in 4 am (Open All Night)
c) Played someone half your age? Yes, in Shakespeare in Hollywood
d) Played someone twice your age? Consistently, in Fair Exchange, A Pirates Life For Me, And Then There Were None, Smile, Once Upon A Mattress, Gilligan's Island, 4am (Open All Night), PoliSatire, Rosencrantz & Guildenstern are Dead...
e) Cried? Nope. Not really my department.
f) Fired a gun? Yes.
g) Driven a car? I will be pretending to drive in Nickle and Dimed
h) Been drenched? Yes, in Inspecting Carol
i) Been in a dream sequence? No, but I choreographed one for Acting Can Be Murder.
j) Been kissed? In scene work. Teachers want me to play the ingenue, directors see me as comedic relief. I gotta side with the directors on this one.

IF YOU WERE ON BROADWAY RIGHT NOW, WHAT SHOW WOULD YOU WANT TO BE IN AND WHAT ROLE WOULD YOU PLAY?
I'm really interested in the production of Cinderella that is on Broadway right now. I saw some clips and a performance at the Macy's Parade. I'm completely fascinated by the costume designs and the era they've set it in. They've taken a very "done" production and given a nice, fresh, decadent flavor. And I love that. I love when someone takes a worn out classic, and gives it all the energy and creative influx that made it a classic to begin with. And I've always wanted to play Joy or Portia.

GIVE FIVE PIECES OF ADVICE YOU WOULD GIVE TO NEW PERFORMERS?

#1. Don't be afraid to bite off more than you can chew. Your mouth will adjust. I used to do two shows a year, a musical and a play. The I started branching out, doing summer work, modeling, birthday parties, etc. Now, I do 10 shows a year. I'm consistently booked, I'm rarely doing less than 3 shows at a time. My resume is huge, my contacts are thriving and I have more letters of rec than I can ever possibly use.

#2. There are very few reasons to ever turn down a role. Unless you're on Broadway, no role is "beneath you". Remember the leads don't always have the most fun. The only time to turn down a role is when you're offered another one and can't do both. Then you have to decide which one is most appealing. You do have to prioritize what is important to you when deciding which role to choose. For me, it's about what is a stand out. If given a choice, what will look better on my resume and makes a casting director pay attention. I was offered roles in Gilligan and Into the Woods on the same day, and chose Gilligan based on the fact that it was original and the opportunity for that wouldn't come up again.

#3. Invest in your own coffee maker. Don't take an Excedrin Migraine and then drink a five hour energy.

#4. Don't get caught up in "being an actor". If someone offers you the chance to stage manage, take it. Become as versatile as possible. Learn to do your own stage make-up. Carry a sewing kit and be prepared to fix a costume. Knowing how to run a sound board has lead me to save the butts of many people, who in turn have gotten many jobs and opportunities.

#5. Direct. The second someone offers you the chance to direct, take it and run. Directing makes you so much better of a performer.

I thought this was more fun than a bio. Since Stage Agent is so in formal, I figured the powers that be wouldn't judge me too harshly. I'll attempt to keep this updated


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