Titus Andronicus

Princes, that strive by factions and by

Marcus Andronicus

Titus Andronicus

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Basics

Character
Gender
Age Range
Style
Scene
Act 1 Scene 1
Time & Place
Ancient Rome
Length
Time Period
Show Type

Monologue Context

After the death of the Emperor of Rome, his two sons are fighting over who will be the next

Monologue Text

Princes, that strive by factions and by friends

Ambitiously for rule and empery,

Know that the people of Rome, for whom we stand

A special party, have, by common voice,

In election for the Roman empery,

Chosen Andronicus, surnamed Pius

For many good and great deserts to Rome:

A nobler man, a braver warrior,

Lives not this day within the city walls:

He by the senate is accit'd home

From weary wars against the barbarous Goths;

That, with his sons, a terror to our foes,

Hath yoked a nation strong, train'd up in arms.

Ten years are spent since first he undertook

This cause of Rome and chastised with arms

Our enemies' pride: five times he hath return'd

Bleeding to Rome, bearing his valiant sons

In coffins from the field;

And now at last, laden with horror's spoils,

Returns the good Andronicus to Rome,

Renowned Titus, flourishing in arms.

Let us entreat, by honour of his name,

Whom worthily you would have now succeed.

And in the Capitol and senate's right,

Whom you pretend to honour and adore,

That you withdraw you and abate your strength;

Dismiss your followers and, as suitors should,

Plead your deserts in peace and humbleness.

William Shakespeare Titus Andronicus Act 1 sc.1 ll.18-45