Indian Ink

Indian Ink

Book:
Category
Play
Number of Acts:
2 Acts
First Produced:
1995
Genres
Drama
Settings
Multiple Settings, Unit/Single Set
Time & Place
1930s to mid 1980s, various locations in india and england
Cast Size
large
Licensor:
Ideal For
professional theatre, broadway, large cast, ensemble cast, strong female roles
Casting Notes:
Mostly male cast
Includes adult, young adult, mature adult, elderly characters

Synopsis

Spanning five decades and two continents, Indian Ink is one of Tom Stoppard’s most ambitious plays.  Like Arcadia, which Stoppard wrote at about the same time, Indian Ink satirizes the self-importance of aristocracy and academia, celebrates the achievements of intellectuals and artists, explores the costs of expressing sexual drives in a repressed and conservative society, and mourns the ephemeral nature of human life.   Indian Ink chronicles the final weeks in the life of fictional English poet Flora Crewe, including her unlikely and intimate friendship with Indian painter Nirad Das.  Meanwhile, in the 1980s, Flora’s now-elderly sister Eleanor speaks to two men with vested interests in uncovering what happened to Flora in 1930.  As in the final scene of Arcadia, Indian Ink alternates between past and present scenes in quick succession, and sometimes puts them onstage simultaneously. The play is painstakingly researched, and is informed by Stoppard’s encyclopedic knowledge of literary history, his considerable familiarity with Indian culture and tradition, and his personal experiences growing up in India.


Characters

Female

Lead

Spoken

Female

Lead

Spoken

Male

Lead

Spoken



Video Clips

See All Videos