A reserved lover, it is said, always mak...

She Stoops to Conquer

Kate Hardcastle

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A reserved lover, it is said, always makes a suspicious husband. [...] He must have more striking features to catch me, I promise you. However, if he be so young, so handsome, and so everything as you mention, I believe he'll do still. I think I'll have him. [...] Well, if he refuses, instead of breaking my heart at his indifference, I'll only break my glass for its flattery, set my cap to some newer fashion, and look out for some less difficult admirer. [...] Lud, this news of papa’s puts me all in a flutter. Young, handsome; these he put last; but I put them foremost. Sensible, good-natured; I like all that. But then reserved, and sheepish, that’s much against him. Yet can’t he be cured of his timidity, by being taught to be proud of his wife? Yes, and can’t I--But I vow I’m disposing of the husband, before I have secured the lover.

Oliver Goldsmith. She Stoops to Conquer. W.W. Norton & Co: New York, 1979. pp.12-13. ll.131-157.

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