O Charmian, Where think'st thou he is...

Antony and Cleopatra

Cleopatra

See more monologues from William Shakespeare

Text

O Charmian,

Where think'st thou he is now? Stands he, or sits he?

Or does he walk? or is he on his horse?

O happy horse, to bear the weight of Antony!

Do bravely, horse! for wot'st thou whom thou movest?

The demi-Atlas of this earth, the arm

And burgonet of men. He's speaking now,

Or murmuring 'Where's my serpent of old Nile?'

For so he calls me: now I feed myself

With most delicious poison. Think on me,

That am with Phoebus' amorous pinches black,

And wrinkled deep in time? Broad-fronted Caesar,

When thou wast here above the ground, I was

A morsel for a monarch: and great Pompey

Would stand and make his eyes grow in my brow;

There would he anchor his aspect and die

With looking on his life.

Act 1, Scene 5, ll.18-33.

All monologues are property and copyright of their owners. Monologues are presented on StageAgent for educational purposes only.

Videos

All monologues are property and copyright of their owners. Monologues are presented on StageAgent for educational purposes only.